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Clin Cancer Res. 2007 Jul 15;13(14):4146-53.

Low expression of Bax predicts poor prognosis in patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy.

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1
Department of Hematology-Oncology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The present study evaluated the prognostic significance of apoptosis-related proteins, p53, Bcl-2, Bax, and galectin-3 in patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy.

EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN:

A total of 63 patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer (squamous cell carcinoma: 62; adenocarcinoma: 1; stages II-IV) were treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy using 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin combined with radiotherapy. Pretreatment tumor biopsy specimens were analyzed for p53, Bcl-2, Bax, and galectin-3 expression by immunohistochemistry.

RESULTS:

High expression of Bax, p53, Bcl-2, and galectin-3 was observed in 67%, 47%, 24%, and 29% of patients, respectively. The median overall survival (OS) of total patients was 14 months with 16% of 3-year OS. High expression of p53, Bcl-2, and galectin-3 did not show correlation with clinicopathologic characteristics, including patient outcome. Low expression of Bax was significantly correlated with lack of clinical complete response (P=0.023). Low expression of Bax was also associated with poor OS (median, 8 months versus 16 months; P=0.0008) in univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis, low expression of Bax was the most significant independent predictor of poor OS (P=0.009), followed by low dose intensity of cisplatin and lack of clinical complete response.

CONCLUSIONS:

Low expression of Bax was significantly associated with the poor survival of patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy using 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin. Immunohistochemical staining for Bax with a pretreatment biopsy specimen might be useful to select the optimal treatment options for these patients.

PMID:
17634542
DOI:
10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-06-3063
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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