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J Nutr. 2007 Aug;137(8):1961-7.

A food pattern predicting prospective weight change is associated with risk of fatal but not with nonfatal cardiovascular disease.

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1
German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Department of Epidemiology, Nuthetal, 14558 Germany. drogan@dife.de

Abstract

Recently, a food pattern predictive for prospective weight change was identified within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Potsdam cohort. Given the possible impact of weight change on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, we examined the association between the above mentioned food pattern and risk of CVD. The analyzed food pattern was defined by a high consumption of whole-grain bread, fruits, fruit juices, grain flakes and/or cereals, and raw vegetables, and a low consumption of processed meat, butter, high-fat cheese, margarine, and meat other than poultry. The associations between quartiles of the food pattern score and CVD morbidity and mortality were examined in 26,238 subjects of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Potsdam cohort using a Cox's Proportional Hazards model for competing risks. During 6.4 y of follow-up, 379 incident cases of CVD were identified, of which 68 were fatal events. The food pattern was not associated with risk of nonfatal CVD. After adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors, the hazard ratios for fatal CVD across increasing quartiles of the score were 1.00, 0.85, 0.31, and 0.47, respectively (P for trend = 0.016). The association of the food pattern with CVD risk differed between fatal and nonfatal events (P for difference = 0.05). These findings from a large German cohort indicate that a food pattern predicting prospective weight change may be associated with the risk of fatal CVD.

PMID:
17634271
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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