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Curr Opin Pediatr. 2007 Aug;19(4):480-7.

Long-term endocrine sequelae of childhood cancer.

Author information

1
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45229, USA. Susan.Rose@cchmc.org

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

To update knowledge related to the long-term endocrine sequelae of childhood cancer.

RECENT FINDINGS:

Endocrine deficiencies are common after cranial irradiation, chemotherapy and specific tumors. These deficiencies include growth hormone, thyrotropin, adrenocorticotropin and gonadotropin deficiencies, primary hypothyroidism, gonadal failure and obesity. Recent studies highlight the impact of radiation on the development of endocrine sequelae. Risks for obesity after childhood tumors include hypothalamic injury, with inactivity and daytime sleepiness. About 6% of adult female survivors of childhood cancer develop persistent ovarian failure. Risks for ovarian damage include ovarian irradiation and alkylating agents. Appropriate fertility-preservation options should be offered. Offspring of women who had uterine irradiation as children are more likely to be born preterm or have low birth weight. Secondary neoplasia or relapse should be considered when treating endocrine deficiencies in cancer survivors. Risk of secondary neoplasia is increased following radiation exposure and certain malignancies. Treatment with growth hormone does not increase cancer recurrence, but survivors may have a 2-fold risk of developing a secondary solid tumor, most commonly a meningioma.

SUMMARY:

Standardized, multidisciplinary long-term surveillance is important in childhood cancer survivors to identify and treat endocrine and other late effects of cancer and its therapy.

PMID:
17630615
DOI:
10.1097/MOP.0b013e3282058b56
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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