Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Addiction. 2007 Aug;102(8):1251-60.

Does cannabis use predict the first incidence of mood and anxiety disorders in the adult population?

Author information

1
Trimbos Institute, Netherlands National Institute of Mental Health and Addiction, Utrecht, The Netherlands. mlaar@trimbos.nl

Abstract

AIMS:

To investigate whether cannabis use predicted the first incidence of mood and anxiety disorders in adults during a 3-year follow-up period.

DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS:

Data were derived from the Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study (NEMESIS), a prospective study in the adult population of 18-64 years. The analysis was carried out on 3881 people who had no life-time mood disorders and on 3854 people who had no life-time anxiety disorders at baseline.

MEASUREMENTS:

Life-time cannabis use and DSM-III-R mood and anxiety disorders, assessed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI).

FINDINGS:

After adjustment for strong confounders, any use of cannabis at baseline predicted a modest increase in the risk of a first major depression (odds ratio 1.62; 95% confidence interval 1.06-2.48) and a stronger increase in the risk of a first bipolar disorder (odds ratio 4.98; 95% confidence interval 1.80-13.81). The risk of 'any mood disorder' was elevated for weekly and almost daily users but not for less frequent use patterns. However, dose-response relationships were less clear for major depression and bipolar disorder separately. None of the associations between cannabis use and anxiety disorders remained significant after adjustment for confounders.

CONCLUSIONS:

The associations between cannabis use and the first incidence of depression and bipolar disorder, which remained significant after adjustment for strong confounders, warrant research into the underlying mechanisms.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center