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J Rehabil Med. 2007 Jul;39(6):486-92.

Determinants of self-efficacy in the rehabilitation of patients with anterior cruciate ligament injury.

Author information

1
Lundberg Laboratory for Orthopaedic Research, Gröna Stråket 12, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden. pia.thomee@orthop.gu.se

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To explore physical and psychological measures believed to determine patients' perceived self-efficacy in the rehabilitation of patients with anterior cruciate ligament injury.

DESIGN:

An explorative descriptive study.

PATIENTS:

A total of 116 patients with an anterior cruciate ligament deficient or reconstructed knee.

METHOD:

At one visit; 12 months post-injury/reconstruction, patients reported their perceived self-efficacy on the Knee Self-Efficacy Scale. Thirty-nine other measures related to self-efficacy were also documented. A linear regression model was applied to identify determinants of perceived self-efficacy.

RESULTS:

40% of the variance in the complete Knee Self-Efficacy Scale was explained by the Lysholm score, Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome ScoreSport/Recreation, Internal Locus of Control and Locus of Control by Chance. The variance in patients' present perceived self-efficacy was explained to 41% by the same measures. Perceived self-efficacy of future capability was explained to 38% by the variance in the Lysholm score, Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome ScoreSport/Recreation, TegnerPresent level and Internal Locus of Control.

CONCLUSION:

Self-reported symptoms/functions and Internal Locus of Control were the most important determinants of self-efficacy in patients with an anterior cruciate ligament injury. In order to strengthen self-efficacy, these determinants should be considered by the clinicians involved in the rehabilitation.

PMID:
17624484
DOI:
10.2340/16501977-0079
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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