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Neuroscience. 2007 Aug 10;148(1):34-43. Epub 2007 Jul 6.

The development of hypocretin (orexin) deficiency in hypocretin/ataxin-3 transgenic rats.

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1
Stanford University, 701 Welch Road, Room 145, Palo Alto, CA 94304-5742, USA.

Abstract

Narcolepsy is linked to a widespread loss of neurons containing the neuropeptide hypocretin (HCRT), also named orexin. A transgenic (TG) rat model has been developed to mimic the neuronal loss found in narcoleptic humans. In these rats, HCRT neurons gradually die as a result of the expression of a poly-glutamine repeat under the control of the HCRT promoter. To better characterize the changes in HCRT-1 levels in response to the gradual HCRT neuronal loss cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) HCRT-1 levels were measured in various age groups (2-82 weeks) of wild-type (WT) and TG Sprague-Dawley rats. TG rats showed a sharp decline in CSF HCRT-1 level at week 4 with levels remaining consistently low (26%+/-9%, mean+/-S.D.) thereafter compared with WT rats. In TG rats, HCRT-1 levels were dramatically lower in target regions such as the cortex and brainstem (100-fold), indicating decreased HCRT-1 levels at terminals. In TG rats, CSF HCRT-1 levels significantly increased in response to 6 h of prolonged waking, indicating that the remaining HCRT neurons can be stimulated to release more neuropeptide. Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep in TG rats (n=5) was consistent with a HCRT deficiency. In TG rats HCRT immunoreactive (HCRT-ir) neurons were present in the lateral hypothalamus (LH), even in old rats (24 months) but some HCRT-ir somata were in various stages of disintegration. The low output of these neurons is consistent with a widespread dysfunction of these neurons, and establishes this model as a tool to investigate the consequences of partial hypocretin deficiency.

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