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J Clin Epidemiol. 2007 Aug;60(8):839-48. Epub 2007 Mar 26.

Social and psychological factors influenced the course of arm, neck and shoulder complaints.

Author information

  • 1Department of General Practice, Erasmus MC, The Netherlands. c.karels@erasmusmc.nl

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the clinical course and prognostic factors of complaints of arm, neck, and shoulder.

STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING:

A prospective cohort study in physical therapy practice. Participating physiotherapists recruited new consulters with musculoskeletal complaints of the neck and/or upper extremities. Participants filled in questionnaires at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months. The main outcome measure was the persistence of complaints over 6-month follow-up. Possible predictors like social and psychological factors, physical factors, and complaint specific factors were tested in univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses for repeated measurements.

RESULTS:

Of the 624 participants at baseline 543 (87%) returned at least one follow-up questionnaire. At 6-month follow-up, 40% had persisting pain and discomfort. Somatization, kinesiophobia, catastrophizing, and a long duration of complaints at baseline were significantly related to the persistence of complaints over 6 months in the total population. In those with paid work (77%), catastrophizing, low decision authority at work, and a long duration of complaints at baseline were significantly related to the persistence of complaints over 6 months.

CONCLUSION:

40% of the participants had persisting pain and discomfort after 6 months and mainly social and psychological factors played a role in this course.

PMID:
17606181
DOI:
10.1016/j.jclinepi.2006.11.012
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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