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Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg. 2007 Sep;101(9):939-47. Epub 2007 Jun 28.

Household and socioeconomic factors associated with childhood febrile illnesses and treatment seeking behaviour in an area of epidemic malaria in rural Ethiopia.

Author information

1
Department of Community Health, Faculty of Medicine, Addis Ababa University, P.O. Box 9086, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. deressaw@yahoo.com

Abstract

To assess household and socioeconomic factors associated with childhood febrile illnesses and treatment seeking behaviour, a study was conducted in Adami Tulu district in Ethiopia during the peak malaria transmission season in 2003. All mothers/caretakers of children <5 years of age were interviewed regarding their household characteristics, history of febrile illness (malaria) among children and actions taken 2 weeks prior to the survey. Of 3873 children, 21% had experienced fever in the past 2 weeks. Household ownership of a mosquito net (odds ratio (OR)=0.4, 95% CI 0.3-0.7) and prior spraying of the house with aerosols (OR=0.7, 95% CI 0.5-0.9) or DDT (OR=0.8, 95% CI 0.6-0.9) were associated with lower risk of febrile illnesses, whilst sharing the house with livestock increased the risk (OR=1.3, 95% CI 1.1-1.6). Treatment was sought for 87% of febrile children, with public facilities, private clinics and community health workers accessed fairly equally (26-27%). Home management was uncommon (6.4%). More febrile children from households in the middle (37.1%) and highest (44.6%) wealth categories sought treatment within 24h compared with the lowest category (18.3%). Widescale use of vector control measures such as mosquito nets and insecticide spraying of houses can effectively reduce the incidence of febrile illnesses among children.

PMID:
17602716
DOI:
10.1016/j.trstmh.2007.04.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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