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Burns. 2007 Sep;33(6):782-7. Epub 2007 Jun 29.

A different and safe method of split thickness skin graft fixation: medical honey application.

Author information

1
Numune State Hospital, Department of Plastic Reconstructive and Aesthetic, Surgery, Erzurum, Turkey. ilterisemsen@hotmail.com

Erratum in

  • Burns. 2009 Sep;35(6):909.

Abstract

Honey has been used for medicinal purposes since ancient times. Its antibacterial effects have been established during the past few decades. Still, modern medical practitioners hesitate to apply honey for local treatment of wounds. This may be because of the expected messiness of such local application. Hence, if honey is to be used for medicinal purposes, it has to meet certain criteria. The authors evaluated its use for the split thickness skin graft fixation because of its adhesive and other beneficial effects in 11 patients. No complications such as graft loss, infection, and graft rejection were seen. Based on these results, the authors advised honey as a new agent for split thickness skin graft fixation. In recent years there has been a renewed interest in honey wound management. There are a range of regulated wound care products that contain honey available on the Drug Tariff. This article addresses key issues associated with the use of honey, outlining how it may be best used, in which methods of split thickness skin graft fixations it may be used, and what clinical outcomes may be anticipated. For this reason, 11 patients who underwent different diagnosis were included in this study. In all the patients same medical honey was used for the fixation of the skin graft. No graft loss was seen during both the first dressing and the last view of the grafted areas. As a result, it has been shown that honey is also a very effective agent for split thickness skin graft fixations. Because it is a natural agent, it can be easily used in all skin graft operation for the fixation of the split thickness skin grafts.

PMID:
17601670
DOI:
10.1016/j.burns.2006.12.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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