Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2007 Jul;88(7):877-84.

The Hopkins Rehabilitation Engagement Rating Scale: development and psychometric properties.

Author information

1
Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. kbechto1@jhmi.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To conduct an initial investigation of the psychometric properties of the Hopkins Rehabilitation Engagement Rating Scale (HRERS), a 5-item, clinician-rated measure developed to quantify engagement in acute rehabilitation services.

DESIGN:

We used a cross-sectional design to conduct correlational and multivariate analyses to establish the measure's internal consistency, interrater reliability, construct validity, and criterion validity.

SETTING:

Acute inpatient rehabilitation in 3 metropolitan hospitals.

PARTICIPANTS:

A total of 206 subjects with spinal cord injury, ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke, amputation, or hip or knee replacement.

INTERVENTIONS:

Not applicable.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

The HRERS, Positive and Negative Affect Schedule, Brief Symptom Inventory, Levine's Denial of Illness Scale, Craig Handicap Assessment and Reporting Technique, and FIM instrument.

RESULTS:

The HRERS has good internal consistency (alpha=.91) and interrater reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient, .73) and represents a unidimensional construct. It correlated negatively with symptoms of depression (r=-.24, P<.01), higher ratings of denial of illness (r=-.30, P<.001), and self-rated negative affect (r=-.23, P<.01), and correlated positively with self-rated positive affect (r=.36, P<.001) and level of functioning 3 months postdischarge (r=.22, P<.01).

CONCLUSIONS:

The HRERS is a valid and reliable measure of rehabilitation engagement that relates to intermediate-term functional outcomes.

PMID:
17601468
DOI:
10.1016/j.apmr.2007.03.030
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center