Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Am J Public Health. 2007 Aug;97(8):1457-63. Epub 2007 Jun 28.

The impact of clean indoor air exemptions and preemption policies on the prevalence of a tobacco-specific lung carcinogen among nonsmoking bar and restaurant workers.

Author information

1
Program Design and Evaluation Services, Multnomah County Health Department and the Oregon Department of Human Services, Portland, OR 97232, USA. mike.j.stark@state.or.us

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We studied the impact of clean indoor air law exemptions and preemption policies on the prevalence of a tobacco-specific lung carcinogen-4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK)--among nonsmoking bar and restaurant workers.

METHODS:

secondhand smoke were compared with results from participants who were exposed to it.

RESULTS:

Participants exposed to workplace secondhand smoke were more likely to have any detectable level of NNAL (P=.005) and higher mean levels of NNAL (P < .001) compared with nonexposed participants. Increased levels of NNAL were also associated with hours of a single workplace exposure (P=.005).

CONCLUSIONS:

Nonsmoking employees left unprotected from workplace secondhand smoke exposure had elevated levels of a tobacco-specific carcinogen in their bodies. All workers--including bar and restaurant workers--should be protected from indoor workplace exposure to cancer-causing secondhand smoke.

PMID:
17600262
PMCID:
PMC1931475
DOI:
10.2105/AJPH.2006.094086
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Atypon Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center