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Environ Health Perspect. 2007 Jun;115(6):971-5. Epub 2007 Jan 25.

Childhood asthma and environmental interventions.

Author information

1
Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15261, USA. few8@pitt.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Contaminants encountered in many households, such as environmental tobacco smoke, house dust mite, cockroach, cat and dog dander, and mold, are risk factors in asthma. Young children are a particularly vulnerable subpopulation for environmentally mediated asthma, and the economic burden associated with this disease is substantial. Certain mechanical interventions are effective both in reducing allergen loads in the home and in improving asthmatic children's respiratory health.

RESULTS:

Combinations of interventions including the use of dust mite-impermeable bedding covers, improved cleaning practices, high-efficiency particulate air vacuum cleaners, mechanical ventilation, and parental education are associated with both asthma trigger reduction and improved health outcomes for asthmatic children. Compared with valuated health benefits, these combinations of interventions have proven cost effective in studies that have employed them. Education alone has not proven effective in changing parental behaviors such as smoking in the home.

CONCLUSIONS:

Future research should focus on improving the effectiveness of education on home asthma triggers, and understanding long-term children's health effects of the interventions that have proven effective in reducing asthma triggers.

PMID:
17589609
PMCID:
PMC1892116
DOI:
10.1289/ehp.8989
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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