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Arch Dis Child. 2007 Nov;92(11):1001-4. Epub 2007 Jun 22.

Outcome for children with cyclical vomiting syndrome.

Author information

1
UCD School of Medicine and Medical Science, The Children's Research Centre Our Lady's Children's Hospital, Crumlin, Dublin, Ireland.

Erratum in

  • Arch Dis Child. 2008 Jan;93(1):93.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Cyclical vomiting syndrome (CVS) is a disorder that carries a significant burden of disease for children and their families. The aim of this study was to examine the outcome of a group of children diagnosed with CVS from 1993 to 2003.

METHODS:

Children diagnosed with CVS over a 10-year period were identified and a review of the clinical records was carried out to define demographic features and the spectrum of disease at presentation. The patient's parent was contacted to establish the child's current well-being. Ethical approval for the study was obtained.

RESULTS:

Fifty one children were diagnosed with CVS and 41 agreed to participate in follow-up. Mean age was 5.8 (SD 3.3) years at onset of CVS, 8.2 (SD 3.5) years at diagnosis, and 12.8 (SD 4.8) years at follow-up. Vomiting had resolved at the time of follow-up in 25/41 (61%) children. Sixteen of 41 (39%) children reported resolution of symptoms either immediately or within weeks of diagnosis. However, a large number of children from the group whose vomiting resolved and the group that were still vomiting continued to have somatic symptoms, with 42% of children suffering regular headaches and 37% having abdominal pain. 32 (78%) parents felt that the provision of a positive diagnosis and information made a significant impact on the severity of vomiting.

CONCLUSIONS:

While 60% of children with CVS have resolution of symptoms, a significant proportion of both those in whom symptoms have resolved and those in whom vomiting persists continue to suffer from other somatic symptoms.

PMID:
17588965
PMCID:
PMC2083597
DOI:
10.1136/adc.2007.116608
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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