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J Cataract Refract Surg. 2007 Jul;33(7):1273-7.

Incidence of cataract surgery from 1980 through 2004: 25-year population-based study.

Author information

1
Department of Ophthalmology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA. erie.jay@mayo.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To estimate sex- and age-specific incidence rates of cataract surgery in a defined United States population and evaluate the change in incidence over time.

SETTING:

Department of Ophthalmology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.

METHODS:

Rochester Epidemiology Project databases were used to identify all incident cataract surgeries in Olmsted County, Minnesota, residents during the 25-year period from January 1, 1980, through December 31, 2004. Annual incidence rates for each sex and 10-year age group were calculated and adjusted to the 2000 U.S. white population. Change in incidence over time was assessed by fitting generalized linear models assuming a Poisson error structure.

RESULTS:

During the study period, 10 245 cataract extractions were performed in 7141 residents of all ages. Overall, the age-adjusted cataract surgery incident rate per 100000 residents was 548 (95% confidence interval [CI], 534-561) for women, 462 (95% CI, 447-478) for men, and 511 (95% CI, 501-521) for all residents. The incidence of cataract surgery increased 500% among women and 467% among men during the study period (P<.001). Overall, the incidence of cataract surgery was highest in residents 70 years and older (3538 surgeries [95% CI, 3322-3764] per 100,000 residents).

CONCLUSIONS:

This population-based study found a substantial increase in incident cataract surgery among Olmsted County residents during the 25-year study period. The rate of cataract surgery increased in a nearly linear fashion during a period when phacoemulsification replaced extracapsular cataract extraction in the community.

PMID:
17586386
DOI:
10.1016/j.jcrs.2007.03.053
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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