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Am Heart J. 2007 Jul;154(1):164.e1-6.

Sirolimus-eluting stents compared with standard stents in the treatment of patients with primary angioplasty.

Author information

1
Hemodynamics and Interventional Cardiology Unit, University Hospital Virgen del Rocio, Seville, Spain. luissalvadordiaz@hotmail.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Sirolimus-eluting stents have been shown to decrease restenosis and reintervention as compared with standard stents. We evaluated the use of sirolimus-eluting stents in primary percutaneous coronary intervention for acute myocardial infarction with ST-segment elevation.

METHODS:

We randomly assigned 120 patients to compare sirolimus-eluting stents with uncoated stents in primary percutaneous coronary intervention for acute myocardial infarction with ST-segment elevation. The primary end point was composite: death from cardiac causes, recurrent myocardial infarction, or target-lesion revascularization after 360 days.

RESULTS:

The rate of the primary end point was 6.7% in the sirolimus-eluting stent and 11% in the bare-metal stent group (relative risk 1.75, 95% CI 0.47-6.57, P = .402). The survival free from target-vessel failure showed a higher trend in the sirolimus-eluting stent group than in the bare-metal stent group (0.0% vs 5.7%, P = .064). There was no significant difference between the 2 groups in the rate of death (5% and 3.6%, respectively; P = .736), reinfarction (1.7% and 1.8%, respectively; P = .940), or stent thrombosis (3.4% and 1.8%, respectively; P = .621).

CONCLUSIONS:

Among selected patients with acute myocardial infarction and ST-segment elevation, the use of sirolimus-eluting stents shows a trend to reduce the rate of target-vessel revascularization in comparison with bare-metal stent.

PMID:
17584571
DOI:
10.1016/j.ahj.2007.04.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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