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Mov Disord. 2007 Sep 15;22(12):1777-82.

Tardive dyskinesia in children treated with atypical antipsychotic medications.

Author information

1
Maryland Psychiatric Research Center, Department of Psychiatry, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21228, USA. iwonodi@mprc.umaryland.edu

Abstract

Recent years have witnessed increased antipsychotic treatment of children despite limited long-term safety data in children. In this study, motor side effects associated with the use of antipsychotic drugs in children were examined in a sample of pediatric psychiatric patients. Child and adolescent psychiatric patients receiving antipsychotics (most were on atypicals) for 6 months or longer (n = 118) were compared with antipsychotic-naïve patients (n = 80) with similar age, sex ratio, and diagnoses. Only 19% of patients on antipsychotics had ever experienced psychotic symptoms. Eleven children (9%) on antipsychotics exhibited dyskinesia, when compared with 0 in the naïve group (P = 0.003, Fisher's exact test). Nine of 62 African-American children (15%) on antipsychotics exhibited dyskinesia, when compared with only 4% (2 of 52) of European-American children (P = 0.003, Fisher's exact test). Children treated with antipsychotic drugs might experience a significant risk of dyskinesia even when treated only with atypical antipsychotics. Ethnicity might also be a risk factor for dyskinesia in children. Side-effect profile of the atypical antipsychotic drugs in children may be much different than that in adults.

PMID:
17580328
DOI:
10.1002/mds.21618
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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