Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Res Sports Med. 2007 Apr-Jun;15(2):125-32.

Do bilateral power deficits influence direction-specific movement patterns?

Author information

1
Department of Health and Exercise Science, The College of New Jersey, Ewing, New Jersey 08628, USA. hoffmanj@tcnj.edu

Abstract

This study examined the effect of bilateral power differences on direction-specific movement patterns in American collegiate football players. Sixty-two college football players performed unilateral vertical jump testing prior to agility testing (3-cone drill). Three trials were performed on the subjects' dominant and nondominant sides. A significant difference (9.7 +/- 6.9%) in unilateral jump power was observed between dominant and nondominant legs. No difference (p>0.05) was seen, however, in agility performance between dominant (8.02 +/- 0.51 s) and nondominant (7.97 +/- 0.51 s) sides. Unilateral power in the nondominant leg had a low-to-moderate, correlation-to-agility sprint times performed on the subject's dominant (r=-0.36, p<0.05) and nondominant (r=-0.37, p<0.05) sides. Although power performance in the nondominant leg appears to correlate to agility performance, bilateral power deficits do not appear to relate to performance differences during direction-specific agility tests.

PMID:
17578752
DOI:
10.1080/15438620701405313
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Loading ...
Support Center