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J Nerv Ment Dis. 2007 Jun;195(6):497-503.

Self-awareness, affect regulation, and relatedness: differential sequels of childhood versus adult victimization experiences.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA. jbriere@usc.edu

Abstract

This study examined abuse and trauma exposure as it predicted identity problems, affect dysregulation, and relational disturbance in 620 individuals from the general population. Multivariate analyses indicated that maternal (but not paternal) emotional abuse was uniquely associated with elevations on all 7 scales of the Inventory of Altered Self-Capacities (IASC): Interpersonal Conflicts, Idealization-Disillusionment, Abandonment Concerns, Identity Impairment, Susceptibility to Influence, Affect Dysregulation, and Tension Reduction Activities. Low paternal (but not low maternal) emotional support was associated with Interpersonal Conflicts, Abandonment Concerns, and Tension Reduction Behaviors. Paternal emotional support did not significantly decrease the negative effects of maternal emotional abuse. Sexual abuse was predictive of all IASC scales except for Interpersonal Conflicts and Identity Impairment. Noninterpersonal traumas and adult traumas were typically unrelated to IASC scales. Childhood emotional and sexual maltreatment--perhaps especially maternal emotional abuse--may be critical factors in the development of disturbed self-capacities.

PMID:
17568298
DOI:
10.1097/NMD.0b013e31803044e2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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