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EMBO J. 1991 Dec;10(13):4041-8.

A mutation in a mild form of galactosialidosis impairs dimerization of the protective protein and renders it unstable.

Author information

1
Department of Cell Biology and Genetics, Erasmus University, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Abstract

The lysosomal disorder galactosialidosis is caused by deficiency of the protective protein in the absence of which the activities of the enzymes beta-galactosidase and neuraminidase are reduced. Aside from its protective function towards the two glycosidases, this protein has cathepsin A-like activity. A point mutation in the protective protein gene, resulting in the substitution of Phe412 with Val in the gene product, was identified in two unrelated patients with the late infantile form of the disease. Expression in COS-1 cells of a protective protein cDNA with the base substitution resulted in the synthesis of a mutant protein that lacks cathepsin A-like activity. The newly made mutant precursor was shown to be partially retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. Only a fraction is transported to the lysosomes where it is degraded soon after proteolytic processing into the mature two-chain form. Since the mutant precursor, contrary to the wild type protein, does not form homodimers, the dimerization process might be a condition for the proper targeting and stable conformation of the protective protein. These results clarify the mechanism underlying the combined deficiency in these patients, and give new insight into the structure-function relationship of the wild type protein.

PMID:
1756715
PMCID:
PMC453152
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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