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J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci. 2007 Jun;62 Spec No 1:11-8.

Should one use medications in combination with cognitive training? If so, which ones?

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1
Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA. yesavage@stanford.edu

Abstract

In this article, we review current research regarding diagnosis of cognitive impairment in nondemented adults and discuss why medications and cognitive training together may be more beneficial than either alone. We also review potential cognitive enhancers and future research challenges. There are major reasons for such research: (a) Large numbers of older adults without dementia but with cognitive problems are not treatable with current cognitive training techniques; (b) some medications offer a rationale (i.e., cognitive enhancement) and some evidence that they might be a useful adjunct; and (c) there are unanswered questions about which population to target, which medications to use, how to administer them, and issues regarding tolerance and use of appropriate (active) placebo controls. As the number of cognitively impaired older adults grows, it is likely that there will be pressure to treat more broadly with both medications and cognitive training.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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