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Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care. 2007 Jul;10(4):415-9.

Evaluation of polymorphisms known to contribute to risk for diabetes in African and African-American populations.

Author information

1
Medicine and Research Services, Central Arkansas Veterans Affairs Healthcare System, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205, USA. elbeinstevenc@uams.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

Populations of direct African ancestry have much greater genetic diversity than do other populations. African-American populations exhibit twice the prevalence of type 2 diabetes as compared with their Caucasian counterparts. African-American populations are likely to have unique genetic susceptibility to type 2 diabetes. This review addresses current knowledge of susceptibility genes that are shared with other groups and those that are unique to populations of African descent.

RECENT FINDINGS:

When compared with the plethora of Caucasian studies, relatively few studies have been conducted in African or African-American populations. The most exciting findings have been family-based linkage studies, which point to multiple regions that may harbor susceptibility genes. Recent work suggests that the major Caucasian locus, TCF7L2, plays a role in some African-based populations, whereas unique factors remain to be confirmed.

SUMMARY:

Although progress has been made in finding the genetic cause of type 2 diabetes in African and African-American populations, at this time no variant can be considered unequivocally confirmed as a diabetes susceptibility locus.

PMID:
17563458
DOI:
10.1097/MCO.0b013e3281e2c99a
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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