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Exp Cell Res. 2007 Aug 15;313(14):3141-52. Epub 2007 May 5.

Notch signaling induces SKP2 expression and promotes reduction of p27Kip1 in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines.

Author information

1
Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Medical Nobel Institute, Karolinska, Institute, von Eulers väg 3, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.

Abstract

In T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) NOTCH 1 receptors are frequently mutated. This leads to aberrantly high Notch signaling, but how this translates into deregulated cell cycle control and the transformed cell type is poorly understood. In this report, we analyze downstream responses resulting from the high level of NOTCH 1 signaling in T-ALL. Notch activity, measured immediately downstream of the NOTCH 1 receptor, is high, but expression of the canonical downstream Notch response genes HES 1 and HEY 2 is low both in primary cells from T-ALL patients and in T-ALL cell lines. This suggests that other immediate Notch downstream genes are activated, and we found that Notch signaling controls the levels of expression of the E3 ubiquitin ligase SKP2 and its target protein p27Kip1. We show that in T-ALL cell lines, recruitment of NOTCH 1 intracellular domain (ICD) to the SKP2 promoter was accompanied by high SKP2 and low p27Kip1 protein levels. In contrast, pharmacologically blocking Notch signaling reversed this situation and led to loss of NOTCH 1 ICD occupancy of the SKP2 promoter, decreased SKP2 and increased p27Kip1 expression. T-ALL cells show a rapid G1-S cell cycle transition, while blocked Notch signaling resulted in G0/G1 cell cycle arrest, also observed by transfection of p27Kip1 or, to a smaller extent, a dominant negative SKP2 allele. Collectively, our data suggest that the aberrantly high Notch signaling in T-ALL maintains SKP2 at a high level and reduces p27Kip1, leading to more rapid cell cycle progression.

PMID:
17560996
DOI:
10.1016/j.yexcr.2007.04.027
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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