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Biol Psychiatry. 2008 Jan 15;63(2):191-6. Epub 2007 Jun 6.

The dysbindin gene (DTNBP1) is associated with methamphetamine psychosis.

Author information

1
Department of Neuropsychiatry, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The dysbindin (DTNBP1 [dystrobrevin-binding protein 1]) gene has repeatedly been shown to be associated with schizophrenia across diverse populations. One study also showed that risk haplotypes were shared with a bipolar disorder subgroup with psychotic episodes, but not with all cases. DTNBP1 may confer susceptibility to psychotic symptoms in various psychiatric disorders besides schizophrenia.

METHODS:

Methamphetamine psychosis, the psychotic symptoms of which are close to those observed in schizophrenia, was investigated through a case (n = 197)-control (n = 243) association analyses of DTNBP1.

RESULTS:

DTNBP1 showed significant associations with methamphetamine psychosis at polymorphisms of P1635 (rs3213207, p = .00003) and SNPA (rs2619538, p = .049) and the three-locus haplotype of P1655 (rs2619539)-P1635-SNPA (permutation p = .0005). The C-A-A haplotype, which was identical to the protective haplotype previously reported for schizophrenia and psychotic bipolar disorders, was a protective factor (p = .0013, odds ratio [OR] = .62, 95% confidence interval [CI] .51-.77) for methamphetamine psychosis. The C-G-T haplotype was a risk for methamphetamine psychosis (p = .0012, OR = 14.9, 95% CI 3.5-64.2).

CONCLUSIONS:

Our genetic evidence suggests that DTNBP1 is involved in psychotic liability not only for schizophrenia but also for other psychotic disorders, including substance-induced psychosis.

PMID:
17555717
DOI:
10.1016/j.biopsych.2007.03.019
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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