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Am Fam Physician. 2007 May 15;75(10):1503-8.

Uterine fibroid tumors: diagnosis and treatment.

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1
Georgetown University-Providence Hospital Family Practice Residency Program, Colmar Manor, Maryland 20722, USA.

Abstract

The incidence of uterine fibroid tumors increases as women grow older, and they may occur in more than 30 percent of women 40 to 60 years of age. Risk factors include nulliparity, obesity, family history, black race, and hypertension. Many tumors are asymptomatic and may be diagnosed incidentally. Although a causal relationship has not been established, fibroid tumors are associated with menorrhagia, pelvic pain, pelvic or urinary obstructive symptoms, infertility, and pregnancy loss. Transvaginal ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, sonohysterography, and hysteroscopy are available to evaluate the size and position of tumors. Ultrasonography should be used initially because it is the least invasive and most cost-effective investigation. Treatment options include hysterectomy, myomectomy, uterine artery embolization, myolysis, and medical therapy. Treatment must be individualized based on such considerations as the presence and severity of symptoms, the patient's desire for definitive treatment, the desire to preserve childbearing capacity, the importance of uterine preservation, infertility related to uterine cavity distortions, and previous pregnancy complications related to fibroid tumors.

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PMID:
17555142
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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