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J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 2007 May;37(5):223-31.

The effect of trunk stability training on vertical takeoff velocity.

Author information

1
School of Physical Therapy, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada.

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN:

Randomized controlled trial with repeated measures.

OBJECTIVES:

To determine the effect of trunk stability training on vertical takeoff velocity.

BACKGROUND:

Trunk stability training is commonly used in sports training programs; however, the effects of stability training on performance enhancement are not known. Trunk stability training may provide a more stable pelvis and spine from which the leg muscles can generate action, may better link the upper body to the lower body, or may enhance leg muscle activation, thus promoting optimal force production during sporting activities such as a vertical jump.

METHODS AND MEASURES:

Fifty-five athletes were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 training groups: trunk stability (TS), leg strength (LS), trunk stability and leg strength (TL), and control (CO). Subjects were tested 3 times: at pretraining, after 3 weeks of training, and after 9 weeks of training. A repeated-measures analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to examine differences among groups for vertical takeoff velocity measured indirectly using a force plate. Pretraining takeoff velocity and body mass were used as covariates.

RESULTS:

After 3 and 9 weeks, the training groups were not different from each other. After 9 weeks of training, all 3 training groups had a greater takeoff velocity than the control group (P<.05). After 3 weeks of training only the TS group had a greater takeoff velocity than the control group (P<.05). Only the TL group increased significantly in vertical takeoff velocity between the third- and ninth-week testing periods (P<.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Nine weeks of trunk stability training was similarly effective in enhancing vertical takeoff velocity as leg strength training or the combination of trunk stability and leg strength training.

PMID:
17549950
DOI:
10.2519/jospt.2007.2331
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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