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Blood. 2007 Sep 15;110(6):1824-30. Epub 2007 Jun 1.

The role of jak2a in zebrafish hematopoiesis.

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1
Department of Medicine, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.

Abstract

Janus kinase 2 (Jak2) transduces signals from hematopoietic cytokines, and a gain-of-function mutation (Jak2(617V>F)) is associated with myeloproliferative diseases, particularly polycythemia vera. In this study, we examined the role of jak2a in zebrafish embryos in knock-down and overexpression studies using morpholinos (MOs) targeting the 5' untranslated region (UTR) (jak2a(UTR)-MO) and splice-site junction (jak2a(SS)-MO) of jak2a, a Jak inhibitor AG490 and a constitutive-active form of jak2a (jak2a(ca)). At 18 and 24 hours after fertilization (hpf), jak2a is expressed predominantly in the intermediate cell mass (ICM; site of primitive hematopoiesis) of wild-type and chordin morphant embryos (characterized by expansion of ICM). Both jak2a MOs and AG490 reduced gata1(+) (erythroid) cells in Tg(gata1:GFP) embryos, signal transducer and activation of transcription 5 (stat5) phosphorylation, and gene expression associated with early progenitors (scl and lmo2) and erythroid (gata1, alphahe1 and betahe1) and myeloid (spi1 [early] and mpo [late]) lineages. The chordin morphant is associated with increased stat5 phosphorylation, and both jak2a MOs and treatment with AG490 significantly ameliorated ICM expansion and hematopoietic gene up-regulation in these embryos. Injection of plasmid encoding jak2a(ca) significantly increased erythropoiesis and expression of gata1, alphahe1 and betahe1, spi1, mpo, and l-plastin. In conclusion, zebrafish jak2a is involved in primitive hematopoiesis under normal and deregulated conditions.

PMID:
17545503
DOI:
10.1182/blood-2007-03-078287
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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