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Clin Nutr. 2007 Aug;26(4):450-9. Epub 2007 Jun 4.

Design of a multispecies probiotic mixture to prevent infectious complications in critically ill patients.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery G04 228, University Medical Center Utrecht, 3508 GA, Utrecht, The Netherlands. h.timmerman@umcutrecht.nl

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS:

Although the potential for probiotics is investigated in an increasing variety of diseases, there is little or no consensus regarding the desired probiotic properties for a particular disease in question, nor about the final design of the probiotic. Specific strain selection procedures were undertaken to design a disease-specific multispecies probiotic.

METHODS:

From a strain collection of 69 different lactic acid bacteria a primary selection was made of 14 strains belonging to different species showing superior survival in a simulated gastrointestinal environment. Functional tests like antimicrobial activity against a range of clinical isolates and cytokine inducing capacity in cultured human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were used to further identify potential strains.

RESULTS:

Specific strains inhibited growth of clinical isolates whereas others superiorly induced the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Based on functional tests and general criteria regarding probiotic design and safety, a selection of the following six strains was made (Ecologic 641); Bifidobacterium bifidum, Bifidobacterium infantis, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus salivarius and Lactococcus lactis. Combination of these strains resulted in a wider antimicrobial spectrum, superior induction of IL-10 and silencing of pro-inflammatory cytokines as compared to the individual components.

CONCLUSIONS:

Application of strict criteria during the design of a disease-specific probiotic prior to implementation in clinical trials may provide a rational basis for use of probiotics.

PMID:
17544549
DOI:
10.1016/j.clnu.2007.04.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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