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Br J Psychiatry. 2007 Jun;190:496-502.

Randomised controlled trial of interpersonal psychotherapy and cognitive-behavioural therapy for depression.

Author information

1
Department of Psychological Medicine, Christchurch School of Medicine & Health Sciences, PO Box 4345, Christchurch, New Zealand. sue.luty@chmeds.ac.nz

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Interpersonal psychotherapy and cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) are established as effective treatments for major depression. Controversy remains regarding their effectiveness for severe and melancholic depression.

AIMS:

To compare the efficacy of interpersonal psychotherapy and CBT in people receiving out-patient treatment for depression and to explore response in severe depression (Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) score above 30), and in melancholic depression.

METHOD:

Randomised clinical trial of 177 patients with a principal Axis I diagnosis of major depressive disorder receiving 16 weeks of therapy comprising 8-19 sessions. Primary outcome was improvement in MADRS score from baseline to end of treatment.

RESULTS:

There was no difference between the two psychotherapies in the sample as a whole, but CBT was more effective than interpersonal psychotherapy in severe depression, and the response was comparable with that for mild and moder-ate depression. Melancholia did not predict poor response to either psychotherapy.

CONCLUSIONS:

Both therapies are equally effective for depression but CBT may be preferred in severe depression.

PMID:
17541109
DOI:
10.1192/bjp.bp.106.024729
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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