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Microbes Infect. 2007 Jun;9(7):881-90. Epub 2007 Mar 21.

MyD88-dependent activation of dendritic cells and CD4(+) T lymphocytes mediates symptoms, but is not required for the immunological control of parasites during rodent malaria.

Author information

1
Centro de Pesquisas René Rachou, FIOCRUZ, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil.

Abstract

We investigated the role of different TLRs and MyD88 in host resistance to infection and malaria pathogenesis. TLR2(-/-), TLR4(-/-), TLR6(-/-), TLR9(-/-) or CD14(-/-) mice showed no change in phenotypes (parasitemia, body weight and temperature) when infected with Plasmodium chabaudi chabaudi (AS). MyD88(-/-) mice displayed comparable ability to wild type animals in controlling and clearing parasitemia. Importantly, MyD88(-/-) mice exhibited impaired production of TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma as well as attenuated symptoms, as indicated by changes in body weight and temperature during parasitemia. Consistently, CD11b(+) monocytes and CD11c(+) dendritic cells from infected MyD88(-/-) mice were shown impaired for production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and in initiating CD4(+) T cell responses. Importantly, the inhibition of T cell activation with anti-CD134L, mostly inhibited IFN-gamma, partially inhibited TNF-alpha production, and protected the animals from malaria symptoms. Our findings suggest that MyD88 and possibly its associated TLRs expressed by dendritic cells play an important role in pro-inflammatory responses, T cell activation, and pathogenesis of malaria, but are not critical for the immunological control of the erythrocytic stage of P. chabaudi.

PMID:
17537666
DOI:
10.1016/j.micinf.2007.03.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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