Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Br J Health Psychol. 2008 May;13(Pt 2):311-25. Epub 2007 Mar 1.

The role of resilience on psychological adjustment and physical health in patients with diabetes.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. joyce.yi@seattlechildrens.org

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study used a longitudinal design to investigate the buffering role of resilience on worsening HbA(1c) and self-care behaviours in the face of rising diabetes-related distress.

METHOD:

A total of 111 patients with diabetes completed surveys and had their glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA(1c)) assessed at baseline and at 1-year follow-up. Resilience was defined by a factor score of self-esteem, self-efficacy, self-mastery and optimism. Diabetes-related distress and self-care behaviours were also assessed.

RESULTS:

Baseline resilience, diabetes-related distress and their interaction predicted physical health (HbA(1c)) at 1 year. Patients with low, moderate and high resilience were identified. Those with low or moderate resilience levels showed a strong association between rising distress and worsening HbA(1c) across time (r=.57, .56, respectively). However, those with high resilience scores did not show the same associations (r=.08). Low resilience was also associated with fewer self-care behaviours when faced with increasing distress (r=-.55). These correlation coefficients remained significant after controlling for starting-points.

CONCLUSION:

In patients with diabetes, resilience resources predicted future HbA(1c) and buffered worsening HbA(1c) and self-care behaviours in the face of rising distress levels.

PMID:
17535497
PMCID:
PMC2899486
DOI:
10.1348/135910707X186994
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center