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BJOG. 2007 Jun;114(6):699-704.

The influence of maternal smoking habits on the risk of subsequent stillbirth: is there a causal relation?

Author information

1
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. lovisa.hogberg.055@student.ki.se

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Maternal smoking has previously been associated with risk of stillbirth. If women who quit smoking reduce their risk of stillbirth, the hypothesis of a causal association would be supported.

DESIGN:

Prospective cohort study.

SETTING:

Nationwide study in Sweden.

POPULATION:

All primiparous women who delivered their first and second consecutive single births between 1983 and 2001, giving a total number of 526,691 women.

METHOD:

A population-based Swedish study with data from the Medical Birth Registry, the Immigration Registry and the Education Registry. Logistic regression analyses were used to estimate odds ratios, using 95% confidence intervals.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

Stillbirth in the second pregnancy.

RESULTS:

Compared with nonsmokers in both pregnancies, women who smoked during the first pregnancy but not during the second do not have an increased risk of stillbirth (OR 1.02; 95% CI 0.79-1.30), while corresponding risk among women who smoked during both pregnancies was 1.35 (95% CI 1.15-1.58).

CONCLUSION:

The result supports that maternal smoking during pregnancy is causally associated with stillbirth risk. Smoking is a preventable cause of stillbirth, and smoking interventions is an important issue in antenatal care.

PMID:
17516961
PMCID:
PMC1974832
DOI:
10.1111/j.1471-0528.2007.01340.x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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