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Diabetes. 2007 Aug;56(8):1951-9. Epub 2007 May 18.

Reduced incretin effect in type 2 diabetes: cause or consequence of the diabetic state?

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1
Department of Internal Medicine F, Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Hellerup, Denmark. filipknop@dadlnet.dk

Abstract

We aimed to investigate whether the reduced incretin effect observed in patients with type 2 diabetes is a primary event in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes or a consequence of the diabetic state. Eight patients with chronic pancreatitis and secondary diabetes (A1C mean [range] of 6.9% [6.2-8.0]), eight patients with chronic pancreatitis and normal glucose tolerance (NGT; 5.3 [4.9-5.7]), eight patients with type 2 diabetes (6.9 [6.2-8.0]); and eight healthy subjects (5.5 [5.1-5.8]) were studied. Blood was sampled over 4 h on 2 separate days after a 50-g oral glucose load and an isoglycemic intravenous glucose infusion, respectively. The incretin effect (100% x [beta-cell secretory response to oral glucose tolerance test - intravenous beta-cell secretory response]/beta-cell secretory response to oral glucose tolerance test) was significantly (P < 0.05) reduced (means +/- SE) in patients with chronic pancreatitis and secondary diabetes (31 +/- 4%) compared with patients with chronic pancreatitis and NGT (68 +/- 3) and healthy subjects (60 +/- 4), respectively. In the type 2 diabetes group, the incretin effect amounted to 36 +/- 6%, significantly (P < 0.05) lower than in chronic pancreatitis patients with NGT and in healthy subjects, respectively. These results suggest that the reduced incretin effect is not a primary event in the development of type 2 diabetes, but rather a consequence of the diabetic state.

PMID:
17513701
DOI:
10.2337/db07-0100
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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