Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Anaesthesia. 2007 Jun;62(6):547-54.

Cost effectiveness of adult intensive care in the UK.

Author information

1
Glan Clwyd Hospital, Rhyl, Denbighshire LL18 5UJ, UK. saxon@ridley.waitrose.com

Abstract

We wished to investigate whether intensive care represents good value for money to the National Health Service in the UK using cost-effectiveness analysis. We developed a cost-effectiveness model using secondary data sources to estimate the incremental cost per quality adjusted life year gained of treatment in intensive care vs non-intensive care treatment in adults. Estimates of hospital mortality with and without intensive care were obtained from seven published studies and from data published by the Intensive Care National Audit and Research Centre. Quality of life estimates were obtained from a literature review and NHS reference costs were used. Relative to non-intensive care treatment, the incremental cost per quality adjusted life year gained of treatment in intensive care is 7010 pounds. This figure is sensitive to the mortality risk reduction associated with intensive care. Despite the high daily cost of intensive care, its cost-effectiveness is excellent and compares favourably with other commonly used health interventions. Our findings suggest that adult intensive care represents good value for money.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center