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J Urol. 2007 Jul;178(1):189-92; discussion 192. Epub 2007 May 17.

Urethral and bladder current perception thresholds: normative data in women.

Author information

1
Division of Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Urology, Loyola University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Given increased evidence of sensory dysfunction in lower urinary tract pathology, we determined normative current perception threshold values in the lower urinary tract of asymptomatic women.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

After receiving institutional review board approval women without lower urinary tract symptoms underwent current perception threshold testing of the urethra and bladder using a Neurometer constant current stimulator. Current perception threshold values were determined at 3 frequencies, including 2,000 Hz (corresponding to A-beta fibers), 250 Hz (corresponding to A-delta fibers) and 5 Hz (corresponding to C fibers).

RESULTS:

A total of 48 women with a mean age of 38 years (range 23 to 67) underwent current perception threshold testing. Normative values were established for the urethra and bladder at 2,000, 250 and 5 Hz. Median urethral current perception thresholds at 2,000, 250 and 5 Hz were 1.2 (IQR 0.76-1.5), 0.45 (IQR 0.33-0.56) and 0.11 mA (IQR 0.07-0.24), respectively. Median bladder current perception thresholds at 2,000, 250 and 5 Hz were 4.1 (IQR 2.0-6.3), 2.3 (IQR 0.87-5.5) and 1.4 mA (IQR 0.22-2.9), respectively. Urethral and bladder current perception thresholds increased significantly with subject age at all 3 frequencies (p<0.0005). Prior pelvic surgery was associated with an increased bladder current perception threshold at all 3 frequencies (p<0.005) but not with the urethral current perception threshold.

CONCLUSIONS:

We report urethral and bladder current perception thresholds for a large sample of asymptomatic women. These reference values may help elucidate changes in afferent nerve function in women with lower urinary tract dysfunction.

PMID:
17499783
DOI:
10.1016/j.juro.2007.03.032
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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