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J Urol. 2007 Jul;178(1):145-52. Epub 2007 May 11.

Effect of comestibles on symptoms of interstitial cystitis.

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  • 1Department of Nutrition, C. W. Post Campus of Long Island University, Brookville, New York, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Anecdotal evidence suggests that patients with painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis report symptom exacerbation after consuming particular foods, beverages and/or supplements. We determined the prevalence of the effect of comestibles on painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis symptoms and identified particular comestible items more likely to affect such symptoms.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

A validated questionnaire designed to detect whether food, beverages and/or supplements have an effect on bladder symptoms was administered to 104 patients meeting National Institute for Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases criteria for interstitial cystitis. In addition to answering general questions about the effect of comestibles on painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis symptoms, subjects were asked to indicate whether each of 175 individual items worsened, improved or had no effect on symptoms. Each response was numerically scored on a scale of -2 to 2 and mean values were generated for each comestible item.

RESULTS:

Of the surveyed patients with painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis 90.2% indicated that the consumption of certain foods or beverages caused symptom exacerbation. There was no correlation between allergies and the effect of comestibles on symptoms. Patients who reported that specific foods worsened symptoms tended to have higher O'Leary-Sant interstitial cystitis symptom index and problem index, and/or pelvic pain and urgency/frequency patient symptom scale scores. A total of 35 comestible items had a mean score of lower than -1.0, including caffeinated, carbonated and alcoholic beverages, certain fruits and juices, artificial sweeteners and spicy foods.

CONCLUSIONS:

There is a large cohort of patients with painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis in whom symptoms are exacerbated by the ingestion of specific comestibles. The most frequently reported and most bothersome comestibles were coffee, tea, soda, alcoholic beverages, citrus fruits and juices, artificial sweeteners and hot pepper.

PMID:
17499305
DOI:
10.1016/j.juro.2007.03.020
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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