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Women Birth. 2007 Jun;20(2):71-6. Epub 2007 May 9.

Passive resistance: early experiences of midwifery students/graduates and the Baby Friendly Health Initiative 10 steps to successful breastfeeding.

Author information

1
School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of South Australia, City East Campus, North Tce., Adelaide, South Australia 5000, Australia. edith.reddin@postgrads.unisa.edu.au

Abstract

PASSIVE RESISTANCE: Early experiences of midwifery students/graduates and the Baby Friendly Health Initiative (BFHI) 10 steps to successful breastfeeding.

RESEARCH QUESTION:

What factors, in relation to the BFHI 10 steps to successful breastfeeding, influence the development of breastfeeding support practice for beginning practitioner midwives?

PROCEDURES:

Newly graduated midwives about to commence a Graduate Midwifery Program (GMP) were recruited from two South Australian universities and one Western Australian hospital to participate in the study.

METHODS:

This qualitative longitudinal study used critical incident technique for a series of three semi-structured interviews with each participant. The theoretical framework of the project was Bandura's Social Learning Theory with Boyatzis' Data driven approach used to thematically analyze the data.

FINDINGS:

Participants highlighted experiences such as time pressure and the established clinical practices of experienced midwives that undermined their commitment to the BFHI 10 steps. Outdated practices by senior midwives and passive resistance to the BFHI 10 steps were commonplace even in participating hospitals which are BFHI accredited.

CONCLUSIONS:

The clinical working environment has a major impact on the way newly graduated midwives integrate the BFHI 10 steps into their breastfeeding support practice. Commitment to the BFHI 10 steps should not be taken for granted just because a hospital achieves BFHI accreditation. Many experienced midwives are continuing with outdated practices that confuse breastfeeding mothers and newly graduated midwives alike.

PMID:
17493886
DOI:
10.1016/j.wombi.2007.04.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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