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Bone. 2007 Jul;41(1):19-24. Epub 2007 Apr 11.

Preserved three-dimensional cancellous bone structure in mild primary hyperparathyroidism.

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1
Regional Bone Center, Helen Hayes Hospital, West Haverstraw, New York 10993, USA. dempster@helenhayeshosp.org

Abstract

By conventional 2-dimensional, histomorphometric analysis, we and others have previously shown that cancellous bone architecture is preserved in mild primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT). We have now extended these observations to a 3-dimensional analysis using microcomputed tomography (microCT). Iliac crest bone biopsies were analyzed from the following subjects with PHPT: 22 postmenopausal women; 7 premenopausal women; similar numbers of normal pre- and postmenopausal women served as controls. Fifteen men with PHPT were also studied. Postmenopausal women with PHPT demonstrated features of preserved cancellous bone as shown by smaller age-related declines in cancellous bone volume (BV/TV) and connectivity density (Conn.D) and no change in bone surface/total volume (BS/TV) as compared to normal women. In postmenopausal women with PHPT, cancellous bone volume (BV/TV), bone surface/total volume, and connectivity density (Conn.D) were all higher, and trabecular separation (Tb.Sp) was lower than in postmenopausal controls. In sharp contrast to the findings in normal women, no structural variables in PHPT women were correlated with age. Also of note, there was no difference in any 3-dimensional index between women and men with PHPT. We conclude that three-dimensional, cancellous bone microarchitecture is preserved in patients with mild primary hyperparathyroidism.

PMID:
17490921
PMCID:
PMC2721277
DOI:
10.1016/j.bone.2007.03.020
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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