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Midwifery. 2009 Apr;25(2):114-25. Epub 2007 Apr 24.

Randomised-controlled trial of two antenatal education programmes.

Author information

  • 1Royal Hospital for Women, Locked Bag 2000, Randwick NSW 2031, Sydney, Australia. jane.svensson@sesiahs.health.nsw.gov.au

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

to determine whether a new antenatal education programme with increased parenting content could improve parenting outcomes for women compared with a regular antenatal education programme.

DESIGN:

a randomised-controlled trial. Data were collected through self-report surveys.

SETTING:

specialist referral maternity hospital in Sydney, Australia.

PARTICIPANTS:

170 women birthing at the hospital. Ninety-one women attended the new programme and 79 the regular programme.

INTERVENTION:

a new antenatal education programme ('Having a Baby' programme) developed from needs assessment data collected from expectant and new parents. One important feature of the programme was the recognition that pregnancy, labour, birth and early parenting were a microcosm of the childbearing experience, rather than separate topics.

MEASURES:

the primary outcome measure was perceived maternal parenting self-efficacy. Worry about the baby, and perceived parenting knowledge, were secondary outcome measures. They were measured before the programme and after birth. Birth outcomes were also recorded.

FINDINGS:

the postnatal perceived maternal parenting self-efficacy scores of women who attended the 'Having a Baby' programme were significantly higher than those who attended the regular programme. Perceived parenting knowledge scores of women who attended the 'Having a Baby' programme were also significantly higher than those who attended the regular programme. Worry scores were lower but they did not reach statistical significant. Birth outcomes were similar.

IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE:

the 'Having a Baby' programme improved maternal self-efficacy and parenting knowledge. Parenting programmes that continue in the early postnatal period may be beneficial.

PMID:
17459542
DOI:
10.1016/j.midw.2006.12.012
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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