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Int J Sports Med. 2007 Oct;28(10):815-22. Epub 2007 Apr 23.

Effects of strength training and reduced training on functional performance and metabolic health indicators in middle-aged men.

Author information

1
Department of Biology of Physical Activity, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.

Abstract

Changes in muscular fitness and metabolic health indicators were examined in 22 men (57.9 +/- 6.6 years, BMI 24.5 +/- 2.6 kg/m (2)) and 21 control men (58.2 +/- 6.1 years, BMI 25.4 +/- 2.8 kg/m (2)) during two consecutive 21-week periods: 1) whole body progressive strength training (ST: twice a week), and 2) continued reduced training (CRT: 3 ST sessions/2 weeks, n = 17 + 17). After the 21-week ST period, maximal strength of leg extensors increased in the ST group by 19.6 +/- 7.6 % vs. 2.8 +/- 4.4 % (p < 0.001) and also 10-m walking time and 10-step stair-climbing time shortened by - 17.2 +/- 7.6 % vs. 4.1 +/- 3.9 % (p < 0.01) and by - 8.2 +/- 6.8 % vs. - 3.0 +/- 6.8 % (p < 0.05) compared to the controls. Systolic blood pressure (BP) decreased in the ST group by - 4.4 +/- 6.7 % vs. 1.3 +/- 9.5 % (p < 0.05) compared to the controls after the ST period. Muscle strength as well as walking and stair-climbing times remained the same during the CRT. However, the changes in diastolic BP (- 8.9 +/- 8.7 % vs. - 1.0 +/- 6.6 %, p < 0.05) and fasting blood glucose concentrations (0.1 +/- 0.4 mmol/L vs. 0.3 +/- 0.4 mmol/L, p < 0.05) differed between the ST and control groups after the whole 42-week study period. Strength training has positive health effects in aging men by increasing maximal strength and functional performance and by decreasing resting blood pressure and high-intensity reduced strength training can maintain these health benefits.

PMID:
17455121
DOI:
10.1055/s-2007-964901
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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