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J Pediatr. 2007 May;150(5):479-84.

Effect of fish oil supplementation on fatty acid status, coordination, and fine motor skills in children with phenylketonuria.

Author information

1
Division of Metabolic Diseases and Nutrition, Dr. von Haunersches Kinderspital, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate effects of long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) on motor skills in patients with phenylketonuria (PKU).

STUDY DESIGN:

Thirty-six patients with PKU (1-11 years of age, good metabolic control: plasma phenylalanine < or = 360 micromol/L for > or = 6 months). We determined plasma phospholipid fatty acids, and in patients > 4 years of age (N = 24) the motometric Rostock-Oseretzky Scale (ROS), before and after supplementation with fish oil for 3 months (15 mg docosahexaenoic acid [DHA]/kg body weight daily). ROS was also assessed in 22 age-matched controls.

RESULTS:

Patients had low n-3 LC-PUFA in plasma phospholipids (DHA, 2.37 +/- 0.10%; eicosapentaenoic acid [EPA], 0.4 +/- 0.03%) and poorer ROS performance than controls (motor development index [MQ] 107 +/- 3 vs 117 +/- 3, P = .010). Supplementation increased phospholipid n-3 LC-PUFA (DHA 7.05 +/- 0.24%; EPA 3.31 +/- 0.19%; P < .001), decreased n-6 LC-PUFA (arachidonic acid, 9.26 +/- 0.23% vs 6.76 +/- 0.16%; P < .001) and improved ROS (MQ 115 +/- 3.54, P = .011, paired t test). ROS was unchanged in 11 retested controls (MQ 115 +/- 5.16, P = NS, paired t test multivariate analysis of variance [MANOVA] for time by group, P = .027). Patients tolerated fish oil well. Plasma phenylalanine remained unchanged.

CONCLUSION:

In patients with PKU, fish oil supplementation enhances n-3 LC-PUFA levels and improves motor skills.

PMID:
17452220
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpeds.2006.12.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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