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Ann Epidemiol. 2007 Jul;17(7):498-502. Epub 2007 Apr 19.

Sociodemographic status, stress, and risk of prostate cancer. A prospective cohort study.

Author information

1
National Institute of Public Health, Copenhagen, Denmark. nrn@niph.dk

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The social gradient in prostate cancer incidence observed in several studies may be a result of differential access to prostate cancer screening. We aim to assess if socioeconomic status, stress, and marital status are associated with prostate cancer risk in a population with free access to health care.

METHODS:

The 5,496 men who participated in the Copenhagen City Heart Study were asked about their income, educational level, stress level, and marital status during 1981-1983. These men were prospectively followed up in the Danish Cancer Registry until the end of 2002 and fewer than 0.1 % were lost to follow-up.

RESULTS:

During follow-up, 157 men were diagnosed with prostate cancer. Neither high income (HR = 1.17, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.78-1.76) nor high education (HR = 1.22; 95% CI: 0.76-1.96) were associated with risk of prostate cancer. There were also no differences in prostate cancer risk according to stress (HR = 0.99; 95% CI: 0.90-1.09) or marital status.

CONCLUSION:

In a racially homogeneous population of Caucasians with free access to health care, we found no evidence of a relation between sociodemographic variables or stress and subsequent risk of prostate cancer.

PMID:
17448677
DOI:
10.1016/j.annepidem.2007.02.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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