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J Oral Pathol Med. 2007 May;36(5):255-61.

Proliferative verrucous leukoplakia and its progression to oral carcinoma: a review of the literature.

Author information

1
Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612-7213, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Proliferative verrucous leukoplakia (PVL) is a distinct clinical form of oral leukoplakia defined by its progressive clinical course, changing clinical and histopathological features, and potential to develop into cancer. PVL behaves in a more aggressive and relentless manner than the more innocuous white oral lesions that it can resemble clinically.

METHODS:

A PubMed search was conducted which identified studies that examined patients with PVL and reported data meeting inclusion criteria.

RESULTS:

PVL is seen much more frequently in females and most often diagnosed after the sixth decade of life. Tobacco use is not strongly linked to the presence of PVL (63% of patients did not use tobacco products). Most (74%) of the patients with PVL progressed to oral carcinoma.

CONCLUSION:

PVL is a persistent and progressive oral lesion that requires very close follow-up along with early and aggressive treatment to increase the chances of a favorable outcome.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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