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PLoS Genet. 2007 Apr 20;3(4):e63.

Population stratification of a common APOBEC gene deletion polymorphism.

Author information

1
Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States of America.

Abstract

The APOBEC3 gene family plays a role in innate cellular immunity inhibiting retroviral infection, hepatitis B virus propagation, and the retrotransposition of endogenous elements. We present a detailed sequence and population genetic analysis of a 29.5-kb common human deletion polymorphism that removes the APOBEC3B gene. We developed a PCR-based genotyping assay, characterized 1,277 human diversity samples, and found that the frequency of the deletion allele varies significantly among major continental groups (global FST = 0.2843). The deletion is rare in Africans and Europeans (frequency of 0.9% and 6%), more common in East Asians and Amerindians (36.9% and 57.7%), and almost fixed in Oceanic populations (92.9%). Despite a worldwide frequency of 22.5%, analysis of data from the International HapMap Project reveals that no single existing tag single nucleotide polymorphism may serve as a surrogate for the deletion variant, emphasizing that without careful analysis its phenotypic impact may be overlooked in association studies. Application of haplotype-based tests for selection revealed potential pitfalls in the direct application of existing methods to the analysis of genomic structural variation. These data emphasize the importance of directly genotyping structural variation in association studies and of accurately resolving variant breakpoints before proceeding with more detailed population-genetic analysis.

PMID:
17447845
PMCID:
PMC1853121
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pgen.0030063
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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