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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2007 Apr 24;104(17):7116-21. Epub 2007 Apr 16.

Stepwise formation of the bacterial flagellar system.

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1
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA.

Erratum in

  • Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2007 Jul 3;104(27):11507.

Abstract

Elucidating the origins of complex biological structures has been one of the major challenges of evolutionary studies. The bacterial flagellum is a primary example of a complex apparatus whose origins and evolutionary history have proven difficult to reconstruct. The gene clusters encoding the components of the flagellum can include >50 genes, but these clusters vary greatly in their numbers and contents among bacterial phyla. To investigate how this diversity arose, we identified all homologs of all flagellar proteins encoded in the complete genome sequences of 41 flagellated species from 11 bacterial phyla. Based on the phylogenetic occurrence and histories of each of these proteins, we could distinguish an ancient core set of 24 structural genes that were present in the common ancestor to all Bacteria. Within a genome, many of these core genes show sequence similarity only to other flagellar core genes, indicating that they were derived from one another, and the relationships among these genes suggest the probable order in which the structural components of the bacterial flagellum arose. These results show that core components of the bacterial flagellum originated through the successive duplication and modification of a few, or perhaps even a single, precursor gene.

PMID:
17438286
PMCID:
PMC1852327
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.0700266104
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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