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Pediatrics. 2007 May;119(5):e1121-5. Epub 2007 Apr 16.

Brain abnormalities in patients with hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome.

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1
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome is a multisystem disorder with abnormalities of the immunologic, connective tissue, and skeletal tissue systems. Central nervous system abnormalities have not been considered a feature of hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome. We aimed to determine whether central nervous system abnormalities detected on brain MRI exist in hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome and to characterize any identified abnormalities.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

Fifty patients aged from 3 to 52 years (mean: 24 years) with established diagnoses of hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome had MRI of the brain as part of an hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome natural history protocol. Abnormalities were described, measured, counted, and mapped. Patient charts were reviewed for neurologic findings and blood pressure measurements.

RESULTS:

Focal brain lesions exhibiting high signal intensities on flow-attenuated inversion recovery and on T2-weighted techniques were found in 35 of the 50 patients. The focal hyperintensities were predominantly in the white matter of the cerebral hemispheres, and the number ranged from 2 to >50. The hyperintensities occurred more frequently in adults than in children, and no association with elevated blood pressure was found. Five patients had lacunar infarctions. Chiari type 1 malformations were found in 9 of 50 patients. Two patients had infectious complications presenting on MRI as cerebritis in 1 patient and as a hemorrhagic infarct in the other; both were found on autopsy to be fungal. Neurologic abnormalities were present in 1 patient with a lacunar infarction, the 2 patients with infectious complications, and in 1 patient with a subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to a berry aneurysm.

CONCLUSIONS:

Central nervous system abnormalities are common in hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome. Focal T2 hyperintensities, not appreciated previously, represent a prominent feature of this rare disease that may assist in diagnosis. The etiology and clinical implications of these abnormalities remain to be investigated.

PMID:
17438082
DOI:
10.1542/peds.2006-2649
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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