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J Rehabil Res Dev. 2006 Nov-Dec;43(7):857-70.

Kinematic and kinetic comparisons of transfemoral amputee gait using C-Leg and Mauch SNS prosthetic knees.

Author information

1
Center of Excellence for Limb Loss Prevention and Prosthetic Engineering, VA Puget Sound Health Care System, 1660 South Columbian Way, Mail Stop 151, Seattle, WA 98108, USA. avasegal@gmail.com

Abstract

The C-Leg (Otto Bock, Duderstadt, Germany) is a microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee that may enhance amputee gait. This intrasubject randomized study compared the gait biomechanics of transfemoral amputees wearing the C-Leg with those wearing a common noncomputerized prosthesis, the Mauch SNS (Ossur, Reykjavik, Iceland). After subjects had a 3-month acclimation period with each prosthetic knee, typical gait biomechanical data were collected in a gait laboratory. At a controlled walking speed (CWS), peak swing phase knee-flexion angle decreased for the C-Leg group compared with the Mauch SNS group (55.2 degrees +/- 6.5 degrees vs 64.41 degrees +/- 5.8 degrees , respectively; p = 0.005); the C-Leg group was similar to control subjects' peak swing knee-flexion angle (56.0 degrees +/- 3.4 degrees ). Stance knee-flexion moment increased for the C-Leg group compared with the Mauch SNS group (0.142 +/- 0.05 vs 0.067 +/- 0.07 N"m, respectively; p = 0.01), but remained significantly reduced compared with control subjects (0.477 +/- 0.1 N"m). Prosthetic limb step length at CWS was less for the C-Leg group compared with the Mauch SNS group (0.66 +/- 0.04 vs 0.70 +/- 0.06 m, respectively; p = 0.005), which resulted in increased symmetry between limbs for the C-Leg group. Subjects also walked faster with the C-Leg versus the Mauch SNS (1.30 +/- 0.1 vs 1.21 +/- 0.1 m/s, respectively; p = 0.004). The C-Leg prosthetic limb vertical ground reaction force decreased compared with the Mauch SNS (96.3 +/- 4.7 vs 100.3 +/- 7.5 % body weight, respectively; p = 0.0092).

PMID:
17436172
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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