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Diabetes Care. 2007 Jul;30(7):1709-16. Epub 2007 Apr 6.

Incretin levels and effect are markedly enhanced 1 month after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery in obese patients with type 2 diabetes.

Author information

1
Obesity Research Center, St. Luke's/Roosevelt Hospital Center, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, 1111 Amsterdam Ave., New York, NY 10025, USA. bbl14@columbia.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Limited data on patients undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RY-GBP) suggest that an improvement in insulin secretion after surgery occurs rapidly and thus may not be wholly accounted for by weight loss. We hypothesized that in obese patients with type 2 diabetes the impaired levels and effect of incretins changed as a consequence of RY-GBP.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS:

Incretin (gastric inhibitory peptide [GIP] and glucagon-like peptide-1 [GLP-1]) levels and their effect on insulin secretion were measured before and 1 month after RY-GBP in eight obese women with type 2 diabetes and in seven obese nondiabetic control subjects. The incretin effect was measured as the difference in insulin secretion (area under the curve [AUC]) in response to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and to an isoglycemic intravenous glucose test.

RESULTS:

Fasting and stimulated levels of GLP-1 and GIP were not different between control subjects and patients with type 2 diabetes before the surgery. One month after RY-GBP, body weight decreased by 9.2 +/- 7.0 kg, oral glucose-stimulated GLP-1 (AUC) and GIP peak levels increased significantly by 24.3 +/- 7.9 pmol x l(-1) x min(-1) (P < 0.0001) and 131 +/- 85 pg/ml (P = 0.007), respectively. The blunted incretin effect markedly increased from 7.6 +/- 28.7 to 42.5 +/- 11.3 (P = 0.005) after RY-GBP, at which it time was not different from that for the control subjects (53.6 +/- 23.5%, P = 0.284).

CONCLUSIONS:

These data suggest that early after RY-GBP, greater GLP-1 and GIP release could be a potential mediator of improved insulin secretion.

PMID:
17416796
PMCID:
PMC2743330
DOI:
10.2337/dc06-1549
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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