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J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2007 Mar-Apr;30(3):186-92.

Immediate effects of manipulation of the talocrural joint on stabilometry and baropodometry in patients with ankle sprain.

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1
Escuela de Osteopatía de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study assessed the immediate effects of talocrural joint manipulation on stabilometric and baropodometric outcomes in patients with grade II ankle sprain.

METHODS:

Fifty-two field hockey players (35 men and 17 women) between 18 and 40 years old (mean = 22.5 years, SD = 3.6 years) were included in this study. A simple blind, intrapatient, placebo-controlled, and repeated-measures study was carried out. All the patients underwent a baropodometric study performed with a Foot Work force platform (4 times; pre-post placebo group and pre-post intervention group). The sample was subjected to two techniques of manipulative treatment: (a) talocrural joint manipulation and (b) posterior gliding manipulation over the talus. In a second instance, placebo manipulation was applied. Unilateral analysis of variance and multivariate analysis of variance were used for statistical analysis.

RESULTS:

The results in the intervention group revealed significant differences in the percentage of posterior load on the foot (P = .015) and the percentage of bilateral anterior load (P = .02) before and after the manipulation. The placebo group did not show any change in any of the variables except for area (P = .045). Intergroup comparison revealed statistically significant differences in the increase in percentage of posterior load on the manipulated foot, percentage of bilateral posterior load, percentage of anterior load on the manipulated foot, and percentage of bilateral anterior load (with the exception of the total load on the foot).

CONCLUSIONS:

The application of caudal talocrural joint manipulation, as compared with placebo manipulation, in athletic patients with grade II ankle sprain redistributed the load supports at the level of the foot.

PMID:
17416272
DOI:
10.1016/j.jmpt.2007.01.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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