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J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2007 Jul 1;45(3):298-303.

Effect of micronutrients and iron supplementation on hemoglobin, iron status, and plasma hepatitis C and HIV RNA levels in female injection drug users: a controlled clinical trial.

Author information

1
Department of Ophthalmology, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. rdsemba@jhmi.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Iron deficiency is common among female injection drug users, but it is unclear whether iron supplementation can reduce anemia and improve iron status without increasing plasma hepatitis C virus (HCV) or HIV RNA levels.

METHODS:

We conducted a phase 3, double-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trial of daily micronutrients with 18 mg of iron (iron group) versus micronutrients without iron (control group) for 12 months among hepatitis C-positive female injection drug users in Baltimore, Maryland. The main outcome measures were hemoglobin, markers of iron status, plasma HCV RNA, plasma HIV RNA, and liver enzymes at 6 and 12 months of follow-up.

RESULTS:

Four hundred fifty-eight women (320 HIV-negative and 138 HIV-positive) enrolled in the trial. There were no significant differences in the proportion of women with anemia, ferritin<30 ng/mL, log10 plasma HCV RNA, or log10 plasma HIV RNA between treatment groups at enrollment. The proportion with anemia in the iron and control groups, respectively, was 20.7% versus 31.3% (P=0.026) at 6 months and 26.2% versus 30.4% (P=0.5) at 12 months; with ferritin<30 ng/mL, the proportion was 29.2% versus 55.5% (P<0.0001) at 6 months and 26.2% versus 46.9% (P=0.0018) at 12 months. In the iron and control groups, respectively, mean log10 plasma HCV RNA (IU/mL) was 5.2 versus 5.2 (P=0.86) at 6 months and 5.4 versus 5.3 (P=0.6) at 12 months. Among HIV-positive subjects, mean log10 plasma RNA (copies/mL) in the iron and placebo groups, respectively, was 3.8 versus 3.7 (P=0.75) at 6 months and 3.7 versus 4.1 (P=0.19) at 12 months. There were no significant differences in liver enzyme levels between the treatment groups at enrollment, 6 months, and 12 months.

CONCLUSIONS:

A daily micronutrient supplement with iron can reduce anemia and improve iron status in female injection drug users without increasing plasma HCV or HIV RNA levels or altering liver enzymes.

PMID:
17414930
DOI:
10.1097/QAI.0b013e318050d698
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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