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Intern Med. 2007;46(7):341-6. Epub 2007 Apr 2.

The association between microalbuminuria and metabolic syndrome in the general population in Japan: the Takahata study.

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1
Department of Cardiology, Pulmonology, and Nephrology, Yamagata University School of Medicine, Yamagata, Japan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The metabolic syndrome is associated with an increased risk of chronic kidney disease, cardiovascular disease and mortality. However, the association between microalbuminuria and the metabolic syndrome has not yet been reported in the general population in Japan. Therefore, we undertook a population-based study to examine the association between microalbuminuria and the metabolic syndrome in Takahata, Japan.

METHODS:

Subjects of this cross-sectional study were individuals aged from 40 to 87 years old. The metabolic syndrome was defined according to the criteria of the Adult Treatment Panel III. Microalbuminuria was defined as a urine albumin-creatinine ratio of 30 to 300 mg/g.

RESULTS:

A total of 2,321 subjects (mean age 64 years old) were entered into the final analysis. Among them, the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome and microalbuminuria was 16.5% and 13.7%, respectively. There was a significantly positive correlation between the number of components of the metabolic syndrome and the corresponding prevalence of microalbuminuria (p<0.001). In the subjects with metabolic syndrome compared with those without metabolic syndrome, the age- and gender-adjusted odds ratio of microalbuminuria was 1.99 (95% CI, 1.49-2.66). Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that high glucose, high blood pressure and obesity were independently associated with microalbuminuria.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our study revealed a strong relationship between microalbuminuria and the metabolic syndrome in the general population in Japan. More comprehensive and intensive management of the metabolic syndrome at its early stage is important to prevent the progression of renal injury and cardiovascular complications.

PMID:
17409594
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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